Lead Paint

Lead Paint

Lead paint was used in homes until it was banned in 1978.  Lead made the paint last longer and the color brighter. You’ll find lead paint on surfaces such as windows, doorframes, baseboards, stairs, porches, and the exterior of the house.  Children under the age of six are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can result in learning problems, behavioral problems, hyperactivity, hearing loss, and a lowered attention span. But there are things you can do to keep your family safe:

  • Watch out for chipping and peeling paint
  • Gently wipe windowsills, floors, porches, and other areas where children play using wet cleaning methods or borrow a HEPA vacuum from CCCHD
  • Don't disturb peeling or cracked paint and never sand, scrape, or burn any paint that you think might be lead paint
  • Keep a good coat of latex paint over top of older paint so that kids children can’t have access to the older paint
  • Make sure any contractors you hire are EPA certified Lead Safe Renovators

Many homes in Springfield and Clark County have been inspected and sometimes abated of lead paint. Find a list of those addresses HERE.

If you are a homeowner performing renovation, repair, or painting work in your own home, EPA's RRP rule does not cover your project. However, you have the ultimate responsibility for the safety of your family or children in your care. If you are living in a pre-1978 home and planning to do painting or repairs, please read a copy of EPA's Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools (PDF) lead hazard information pamphlet. Property owners who renovate, repair, or prepare surfaces for painting in pre-1978 rental housing or space rented by child-care facilities must, before beginning work, provide tenants with a copy of EPA's lead hazard information pamphlet as well.