New Solid Waste Regulations

Solid Waste: Bulk & Residential Haulers

Solid waste is any unwanted natural or manmade junk item like bags of garbage, tires, litter, household rubbish, cardboard, street dirt, junk furniture, bedsprings and junk appliances. Clark County Combined Health District is an Approved Health District and has jurisdiction over Ohio EPA solid waste regulations in Clark County. For a copy of the Clark County Combined Health District Sanitary Regulations for Solid Waste Management for Clark County that were approved on March 15, 2012 and will be in effect on April 20, 2012, click here.

Send us an email to receive a list of trash collectors and other solid waste haulers. To get more information on the services and programs listed below, contact the CCCHD at (937) 390-5600.

Composting Facilities

What is composting? Composting is a smart and environmentally friendly way of dealing with yard wastes. Composting transforms organic wastes from gardens, flowerbeds, and lawns into a valuable soil amendment that leads to faster-growing and healthier plants.

Homeowners can learn how to incorporated composting into their lives by using resources from the Ohio EPA.

What is a composting facility? A composting facility is an operation that is either registered or licensed by the Ohio EPA or the local health district to receive waste products, produce compost and distribute it to the public.

Click here for a list of local composters.

How do I become a composting facility? Information on obtaining permits and licenses for solid waste composting facilities may be obtained at the Ohio EPA website or by calling (937) 390-5600.

Click here for the composter license application.

Construction and Demolition Debris Facilities

What is construction & demolition debris? Construction and demolition debris are the waste items produced when manmade structures are built or demolished and includes items like waste wood, insulation, siding, and roofing.

What is a construction & demolition debris facility? A construction & demolition debris facility is an operation that is either registered or licensed by the Ohio EPA or the local health district to receive waste items.

How do I become a construction & demolition debris facility? Information on obtaining permits and licenses for C & DD facilities may be obtained at the Ohio EPA website or by calling (937) 390-5600.

For a current facility:

Springfield Landfill C & DD Landfill

2600 Mechanicsburg Road

937-629-0551

For a list of our open facilities, click here.

Four C & DD facilities are closed:

Closed C & DD Facility

Address

Date of Last Inspection

IOOF Home

McCreight Avenue

10-13-2010

L & L Demolition

Dayton Avenue

10-13-2010

Former Mike Hart C & DD

E. National Road

10-13-2010

Ron Brown Lower-Valley Pike

Gerlaugh Road

7-9-2007

Fill Locations

What is a fill location? A fill location is an area where the grade of the land is changed by bringing fill dirt or clean hard fill onto the property from another address.

What do I do if I wish to have a fill location? Anyone wishing to change the grade on a property in Clark County by accepting fill material from off-site must submit a Notice of Intent to Fill form to the Health District.

What if I want to demolish a structure on my property? Can I bury it on site? In certain circumstances, a property owner can demolish and bury, on-site, an existing structure. Contact the Health District for more information at (937) 390-5600.

Trash Collection Vehicles and Haulers

What is a trash collection vehicle? A trash collection vehicle is one that either provides regular pickup of residential or commercial trash and garbage or one which provides pickup of bulky waste items, like junk furniture.

Why should these vehicles be licensed? Unlicensed trash collectors frequently illegally dispose of the items they collect. In addition, their loads may be insecure and fall on the road or other vehicles.

How does a person become a licensed trash collector? All persons who wish to provide solid waste collection services must be licensed through the Clark County Combined Health District.

How do I hire a licensed hauler? Contact the Health District at 390-5600, extension 251 to request a list.

How do I report an unlicensed trash collection vehicle? Contact the Health District at 390-5600, extension 251 to report a problem.

Resources:

Salvage Yards

What is a salvage yard? A salvage yard is a facility where metal and/or junk motor vehicles are salvaged for parts and for metal.

How are they permitted? In the City of Springfield, salvage yards are licensed in the City of Springfield. In the county, the townships regulate salvage yards.

How do I become a salvage yard? – The City of Springfield has documentation about salvage yards, including stipulations and requirements.

Click here to view a list of Clark County area salvage yards.

Open Dumping & Open Burning

What is open dumping and open burning? Open dumping is the placement of waste items on the ground in a location not licensed to receive waste items. Open burning is the burning of waste items in an open area.

How do I report open dumping? Contact the Health District at 390-5600, extension 251 or the Litter Hotline at 937-32-TRASH.

How do I report open burning? Contact the Health District at 390-5600, extension 251 or the Regional Air Pollution Control Agency (RAPCA) at (937) 225-4435 or toll-free at (800) 458-2115.

Zero-Waste Events

A “Zero Waste” event is planned to reduce trash and garbage – organizers and participants plan to re-use materials, segregate and compost food scraps, and provide dishes, utensils, napkins, and other food service materials that are re-usable or compostable. Volunteers monitor waste stations to assist participants with the sorting process.

At all three (3) Clark County events since 2009:

  • Mini-grants were obtained from the Clark County Waste Management District.
  • Compostable products were donated or purchased from Whole Foods (Columbus), Paygro (Class II Composting Facility in South Charleston), and other local vendors.
  • Recyclables were accepted by the Clark County Waste Management District and other local businesses.
  • Food residuals and compostable materials were composted by Paygro.

Latest Events

Event

Location

Date

2009 Diversion

2010 Diversion

2011 Diversion

OSU Extension Jubilee

OSU Extension          

Aug 6, 2011

91.5 %

91.2%

92.5%

Envisioning a Greener Springfield (proposed)

Springfield             

Mar  2012

_

_

_

Closed Dumps, Landfills and Other Known Sites of Concern

What is a dump location? A dump location is any property that was used, prior to Ohio EPA solid waste regulations, to dispose of waste materials.

For a list of closed sanitary landfills and other useful information, see the resources below:

Closed   Landfill / Dump

Last inspection

Status of EGMPs

Other Issues

Bird Road    Dump

06-29-2011

Doesn’t need – closed prior to July 1, 1970

None

Crabill Road Landfill

04-08-2008

NEED - currently in negotiations with Ohio EPA

None

Dayton Road Landfill

06-28-2011

Doesn’t need – closed prior to July 1, 1970

Leachate Outbreaks

Haulman’s Landfill

10-13-2011

NEED - currently in negotiations with Ohio EPA

Scrap Tires

Limestone City Landfill

08-10-2011

HAS - compliant with Ohio EPA rules

None

New Carlisle Landfill

07-17-2007

NEED - currently in negotiations with Ohio EPA

Superfund - VOC release into GW

Plattsburg Road Dump

06-29-2011

No information on explosive gas at this site

 

Ruscot’s  Dump

01-10-2011

Doesn’t need – closed prior to July 1, 1970

Scrap Tires

Springfield Landfill (I 70 and SR 72)

06-08-2009

NEED - currently in negotiations with Ohio EPA

 

Blee Road Landfill (SR 72 and SR 68)

06-29-2011

Doesn’t need – closed prior to July 1, 1970

Periodic Leachate Release

Tremont

Landfill

06-27-2011

HAVE - currently have a plan that includes a LGTE project

Superfund – contaminant release into GW

What is explosive gas? Explosive gas is generated in landfills as the waste materials degrade in anaerobic conditions and is a mixture of several gases that are, in certain circumstances, flammable and explosive.

Do any Clark County closed landfills have explosive gas? Yes, several closed landfill have explosive gas issues. In 2003, the CCCHD helped the OEPA identify which closed landfills needed Explosive Gas Monitoring Plans (EGMPs).

What is an Explosive Gas Monitoring Plan?

OAC 3745-27-12 requires that the owner of a previously licensed closed landfill submit an Explosive Gas Monitoring Plan (EGMPs) to the Ohio EPA, if:

1.      The facility was licensed for acceptance of solid waste materials,

2.      The facility closed between July 1, 1970 and June 1, 1994, and

3.      The facility property is so situated that a residence or occupied structure is located within 1000 feet of the limits of buried wastes.

 

Infectious Waste Generators

Any business that generates infectious waste is considered an infectious waste generator and is subject to Ohio’s infectious waste regulations. An infectious waste generator is classified as a small generator when less than 50 pounds of infectious waste are generated per calendar month and a large generator when 50 pounds or more of infectious waste are generated per calendar month.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) has guidance documents for both large quantity generators and small quantity generators.

How do I register as a large quantity infectious waste generator? Information on registering as an infectious waste generator may be obtained at the Ohio EPA website or by calling (937) 390-5600.

You can access an application for a large quantity IW generator here.\

Scrap Tire and Transporters

What is a scrap tire accumulation?  

Ohio EPA regulations define a “scrap tire” as any unwanted or discarded tire. It could be a whole tire, a new tire, a good used tire, a cut tire, or any piece of a tire still identifiable as a tire.

List of known Clark County scrap tire accumulations

There are approximately eighteen (18) accumulations of scrap tires in Clark County, amounting to approx. 9,820 scrap tires. Since 1998, approx. Approximately 1,280,521 scrap tires have been removed from Clark County (list available here).

What happens to these piles? The Health District orders the removal of nuisance scrap tires.

What about mosquitoes and tires? The Health District orders the regular application of pesticides to control mosquitoes.

How do I report a scrap tire pile? Call 390-5600

What is a Scrap Tire Transporter? A scrap tire transporter is an operator, registered with the Ohio EPA, that can legally collect and transport scrap tires.

How do I become a scrap tire transporter? Information on obtaining licenses for scrap tire transporters or other facilities may be obtained at the Ohio EPA website or by calling (937) 390-5600. An application form is available here

Clark County Scrap Tire Transporters

Tony Smith Trucking

2855 Oletha Ave.

937-325-9646

Tire Amnesty Grant

The Health District did not apply for an ODNR Scrap Tire Amnesty Grant in 2011, but did help the Mad River Township Trustees to write an ODNR Scrap Tire Amnesty Grant application to fully fund a community tire collection event and to partially fund the final cleanup of the legacy tire pile at the Haulman Landfill. The township received the grant and commenced activities with a community cleanup event on September 17, 2011. With the approval of the CCCHD, the owner of Haulman’s Landfill contracted with Mad River Township to remove all scrap tires by the end of the grant period (May 31, 2012) to receive funding assistance.

Use of Tire-Derived Chips as a replacement for aggregate in on-site septic systems

The CCCHD presented information to the Technical Advisory Committee of the ODH on the use of tire-derived chips as a replacement for gravel aggregate in on-site septic systems in 2nd Quarter 2010.

Using information from the 2000 – 2004 study on such systems in Clark County (including specifications), the Technical Advisory Committee of the ODH approved the use of tire-derived chips as a Special Device in 3rd Quarter 2010, freeing the chips from the “experimental system” designation. 

Need for Greenhouse Gas Reports (GGRs)

The US EPA issued a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting rule on September 22, 2009, requiring open and closed landfills to calculate and report emissions (starting in 2010 with a reporting due date of March 2011 to the USEPA) if they:

1.      Accepted waste after January 1, 1980

2.      Currently generate > 25,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents per year

The Regional Air Pollution Control Agency (RAPCA) expected to receive copies of the reports from the USEPA in 2nd Quarter 2011.

Closed   Landfill

Last inspection

Status of GGRs

Limestone City Landfill

10-05-10

No report yet received from RAPCA

Tremont Landfill

06-27-2011

No report yet received from RAPCA

Debris Management Plans

The Ohio Emergency Management Agency encourages counties to develop local debris management plans to facilitate the management and disposal of disaster-related debris streams and to ensure that remedial work is eligible for FEMA reimbursement. The Health District assisted the Clark County EMA to write a Disaster Debris Management (DDM) Plan for the county. 

Instances of Environmental Contamination

The Health District has recently assisted with the investigation of several contaminated sites.

Donnelsville Elementary School, Donnelsville

In October 1995, Ohio EPA sampled the former elementary school well and five private wells because an earlier sample at the school well showed the presence of perchloroethylene (PCE), also known as tetrachloroethylene.  All samples showed PCE, but none of those levels were higher than US EPA deems to be safe for drinking water. In September, 2010, as part of ongoing studies to detail the contamination of the aquifer in the area, Ohio EPA sampled 36 private wells and found PCE in 23 of the wells. While none of the one-time samples indicated an immediate health risk, there were nine above the allowable levels in drinking water and (of those nine) seven were above the US EPA cancer risk guideline.

In 2011, the Health District assisted the Ohio EPA to communicate with residents, sample water wells, identify twenty-two (22) wells with PCE above maximum contaminant levels, and install eighteen (18) US EPA-funded water treatment systems (2 granular activated charcoal systems and 16 air stripping systems).

Section Street Springs, Springfield

The Section Street Springs, as the name suggests, is an area of springs on the cliff-face behind 601 E. Main Street and 17 Penn Street, and near Section Street, in Springfield, Ohio. The spring at 601 E. Main Street was the water supply for a brewery in the early 1900’s, and local residents began using it as a source of drinking water after the brewery closed, filling containers for home consumption. In 1995, the spring water was sampled and found to contain PCE at 892 ug/l, which is in excess of the MCL. Starting in 1996, and continuing through 1998, the Ohio EPA conducted investigations of both soils and ground water in the vicinity to determine the source of PCE.

The source was determined to be the Champion Company, a former manufacturing company less than ½ mile up-gradient. Champion Company is currently undertaking remediation steps under the Voluntary Action Program (VAP) with Ohio EPA oversight.

The spring at 601 E. Main Street is still flowing, is piped into a basin that is attractive and easily accessible to the public, and was recently renovated as a local memorial. A posted health warning was placed near the spring in 1996 to prevent consumption of the water; that sign was removed during renovation activities and discarded. The Health District purchased a replacement sign to be re-posted in 4th Quarter 2011. Note - because access to the spring and basin cannot be restricted, local residents may still be drinking the water in spite of a posted health warning.

Former Wiles Mobile Home Park, Medway

In the mid-1980s, the public water supply well serving the Wile MHP showed PCE detections well above the MCL. In 1990, the Health District did not renew the MHP license because the park owner was unable to provide a public water supply with a PCE level below the MCL. The park was closed and the residents relocated.

In 2011 the Health District requested the Ohio EPA to add this property to the list of sites to be ‘pre-screened’ for inclusion in the Superfund data base.  During this ‘pre-screen’ process, the Ohio EPA discovered an occupied manufactured home on the property that was using water from the contaminated well. On August 31, 2011, the Health District collected a water sample from this well for PCE analysis. The PCE result from September 13, 2011 showed a PCE level above MCL.  The residents and property owner were advised of the potential health risks associated with consumption of water with increased levels of PCE and advised to obtain an alternative source of drinking water. The Health District is currently attempting to contact neighboring property owners to expand the area of PCE sampling to better define the affected area.

Former Haulman’s Landfill

This landfill is currently abating a scrap tire accumulation under a 5-year Scrap Tire Drawdown Plan approved by the Board of Health with a due date of December 31, 2011. Approximately 10,000 scrap tires have been removed since the plan was signed in 2007.

The Health District helped the Mad River Township Trustees to write an ODNR Scrap Tire Amnesty Grant application to fully fund a community tire collection event and to partially fund the final cleanup of the legacy tire pile at Haulman’s Landfill. The township received the grant and commenced activities in 3rd Quarter 2011. With the approval of the CCCHD, the owner of Haulman’s Landfill contracted with Mad River Township to remove all scrap tires by the end of the grant period (May 31, 2012) to receive funding assistance.

Former New Carlisle Landfill

This site was designated a Superfund site in 1st Quarter 2009 due to its probable association with VOC contamination of nearby, down-gradient potable drinking water wells. We can provide very good figures from Ohio EPA’s Expanded Site Investigation (ESI) document. The Ohio Department of Health released a draft Public Health Assessment (PHA) of the landfill in 3rd Quarter 2011, warning of the health effects of vinyl chloride in drinking water. Good location for link to Springfield News Sun article. The CCCHD is scheduled to conduct water sampling of the four (4) closest, downstream drinking water wells for VOC’s on Oct 24, 2011. We can provide very good maps showing the addresses and the approximate extent of the chloroethane and vinyl chloride plumes.  

Former Springfield Landfill (I-70 and SR 72)

Clark County and a private developer plan to apply for Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund (CORF) dollars to remediate and reuse the former Springfield Landfill at I-70 and SR 72. The first step is a Project Resource and Advisory Meeting (PRAM) and site visit between Clark County, the developer, various Ohio EPA divisions, the Health District, and the Ohio Department of Development. Such a meeting is scheduled for November 10, 2011 and will address any required activities related to the development of a closed landfill. There may be contamination issues that need long-term treatment. We can provide a very good map showing the Springfield Landfill site.

Former Tremont Landfill

Settled lawsuit for violation of BOH order – Consent Order signed July 29, 2010

A consent order was signed on 7-29-2010, including civil penalties. A portion of that penalty – $20,000 – was reserved for the Health District as a Supplemental Environmental Project to be paid in $2500 increments.

Issues of concern

The Health District and the Ohio EPA continue to monitor the adequacy of mandated post-closure care provided by the Tremont Landfill Company.

OPERATION OF THE LANDFILL GAS-TO-ENERGY SYSTEM

  • For many years, landfill gas has been smelled and observed bubbling through the standing water on-site. A “Rule 13 Authorization” to allow Springfield Gas to expand the current Landfill Gas-to-Energy Project (LGTE) to better collect gas was approved by the Ohio EPA on August 29, 2011. Work is expected to commence in 2nd Quarter 2012.  
  • Per RAPCA, the required minimum temperature for the backup flare is 1622oF, but that temperature is not met on a consistent basis and varies between 1200oF – 1600oF on any given day when the flare is operating.

Superfund Status

The US EPA continues to negotiate with potentially responsible parties (PRPs) for an administrative order (“Proposed Administrative Settlement and Order on Consent for Removal Action; and Revised Negotiation Period”) for the Tremont Landfill Superfund Site.

Former Tremont City Barrel Fill

Superfund Status

The US EPA selected a final cleanup plan for the Tremont City Barrel Fill Superfund Site – Alternative 9A – in 2011. The Health District wrote an extensive and detailed comment letter in opposition to this selection. The documents referenced in the comment letter are available here. The US EPA response to public comments was not acceptable to the Health District and legal action is expected to take place in 4th Quarter 2011.

Landfill gas (approximately 50% methane gas and 50% carbon dioxide) is a byproduct of anaerobic waste decomposition of organic materials within a landfill and – like natural gas – can be used as a fuel. One landfill gas-to-energy (LGTE) project is located in Clark County at the Tremont Landfill. It is currently managed by the Springfield Gas Company and the end-user of the collected gas is Navistar.

Mercury Exchange Program

For information on our waste management of mercury, visit our Mercury Exchange Program page.

Other resources: