Record Number of Mosquitos Trapped in Springfield

Record Number of Mosquitos Trapped in Springfield

Springfield, Ohio –
 
The Environmental Health Division of the Clark County Combined Health District has trapped a record number of mosquitos in the north and southwest areas of Springfield. Mosquito populations are seven times higher than they were last year and the highest since CCCHD started trapping mosquitos four years ago.

Due to heavy rains and ground saturation there is water pooling in many areas. This provides easy and plentiful breeding grounds for the mosquitos. Wetter environmental conditions make it even more important for people to protect themselves from mosquito bites:  Avoid, Plan, Stop
 
AVOID:
Apply repellents on exposed skin registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Wear long sleeves and pants or consider staying indoors as much as possible.
PLAN:
If traveling, check ahead of time for travel advisories, and plan accordingly.
Have EPA approved mosquito repellent and long pants and shirts available to avoid bites.
Do outside activities at times when mosquito activity is less.
STOP:
Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying or treating any standing water on your property (even small amounts of standing water can be a breeding site for mosquitos). 
Make sure screens on windows and doors are free of holes or rips. You may also opt to utilize air conditioning instead of open windows if possible.
 
In response to the increase in mosquito population, CCCHD is
  • Inspecting the affected area and working with property owners to reduce breeding sources by draining stagnant water or treating stagnant water with products containing Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti).  Bti is safe for humans and pets.
  • Distributing informational flyers in the affected area.
  • Misting the affected area with Duet® to reduce the adult mosquito population when weather permits.  While safe for humans and pets, residents who have a concern about misting may opt out by calling  937-390-5600 or emailing the request and their address to environmental@ccchd.com.
  • Continuing to monitor for increased population